Faversham House
Model of Care

BASScare is committed to providing care that is person-centred and creates the least amount of change to prior routines. Our model of care is based on available best practice evidence. Our focus is to provide dignity and choice, independence and respect to our residents.

Our Model of
Care

We are using the Eden Alternative as the basis for our care design and delivery. The current Aged Care system focusses on what a resident can’t do for themselves, and therefore what needs to be done for them. Instead, we aim to focus on enabling residents to maintain maximum dignity, independence, control and choice. We want to encourage resident participation in the day to day household activities.

We want to encourage our staff to challenge the traditional models of aged care and design and deliver care and services that are flexible and accommodating.

The
Eden Philosophy

The Eden Alternative was designed by a GP in the United States who was caring for residents in Nursing Homes. He felt frustrated that he could prescribe medications and treatments to help with physical ailments but couldn’t help make the lives of residents better. He described three plagues of aged care: Loneliness, Helplessness and Boredom. He believed that the cures were centred on animals, plants and children. The Eden Alternative focuses on giving equal measure of care to the heart and mind as to the body.

The Eden Alternative focuses on giving an equal measure of care to the heart and mind as to the body.

  1. The three plagues of loneliness, helplessness, and boredom account for the bulk of suffering among our Elders.
  2. An Elder-centred community commits to creating a Human Habitat where life revolves around close and continuing contact with people of all ages and abilities, as well as plants and animals. It is these relationships that provide the young and old alike with a pathway to a life worth living.
  3. Loving companionship is the antidote to loneliness. Elders deserve easy access to human and animal companionship.
  4. An Elder-centred community creates opportunity to give as well as receive care. This is the antidote to helplessness.
  5. An Elder-centred community imbues daily life with variety and spontaneity by creating an environment in which unexpected and unpredictable interactions and happenings can take place. This is the antidote to boredom.
  6. Meaningless activity corrodes the human spirit. The opportunity to do things that we find meaningful is essential to human health.
  7. Medical treatment should be the servant of genuine human caring, never its master.
  8. An Elder-centred community honours its Elders by de-emphasizing top-down, bureaucratic authority, seeking instead to place the maximum possible decision-making authority into the hands of the Elders or into the hands of those closest to them.
  9. Creating an Elder-centred community is a never-ending process. Human growth must never be separated from human life.
  10. Wise leadership is the lifeblood of any struggle against the three plagues. For it, there can be no substitute.

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